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     Plano has changed dramatically in the last 30-40 years with a population now of over 220,000.  The name Plano means flat in Spanish and that is definitely true of west Plano.  Until the 60s real estate consisted of a few farms and land planted in maize, cotton and wheat. The creeks usually were dotted with native pecan and some oak trees but for the most part there were few real estate developments. A remnant of this earlier kind of life can be found at the corner of Custer and Park where the remains of a large farm are found.  There is also a historic farmstead musuem set up for tour.  The Heritage Farmstead Museum can be found at 1900 W. 15th St. in Plano and all sorts of events are going on thru out the year.        

     Plano has a small amount of land left for development.  Most of that is located in East Plano.  The housing market in Plano is very diverse and offers lots of different types of housing. T
here is also a huge range of prices for homes from around $80,000 to the millions.  Duplexes, condos, starter homes, custom homes, ranchettes and estate homes are found from one end of Plano to the other. Please feel free to use our search for homes on the home page or the one inside this page.

 

Schools have been an important part of Plano life whether it was Friday nite football or having one of the highest number of Advanced Placement courses in the country offered to its students.  Schools have been divided into kindergarten thru 6th grade, 7- 8 grades, 9-10 and 11-12.  Schools have attracted a high quality of teachers and a very high rate of graduates that go on to higher education.  Students in Plano have several choices near by in addition to Collin Creek Community colleges and the University of Dallas in Richardson.  Many graduates go on to Texas universities as well as Ivy League schools.

 

Subdivisions were created in the late 60s and 70s above Plano Parkway and were semi custom homes with fairly large lots.  Trees were at a premium then unless a resident owned a home close to a creek.  Now trees are no long matchsticks but full sized trees that often create shade covered streets in the older parts of Plano.  The west side of Plano has very little land left for building.  Plano stretches all the way to the toll road and north in some parts as far as highway 121.  Prices range from the low 100s for older tract homes all the way to multimillion dollar mansions. Duplexes, condos, townhouse, zero lot lines, patio homes and huge mansions give a lot of choices for buyers who want a range of price and good schools.

 

Those who live in far West Plano tend to use the Toll road to go downtown or to access 635 (LBJ) for a commute to the D/F.W. airport or Los Collinas.  George Bush Freeway has created a whole new way to travel from east to west and has connected suburbs to the east into the Metroplex making commuting an easier task.

 

 

The east side of Plano is a bit more rolling and it begins just on the east side of 75.  The original downtown Plano has parts of the old brick streets and a collection of specialty shops and restaurants that set a quaint tone.  The old train line in this area has been replaced by the DART system for Planoites to go from Plano all the way to downtown Dallas and even beyond to south Dallas and the Dallas zoo. People who live on the east side of Plano use 75 as their main expressway. Homeowners can find a few new homes being built.  Meanwhile the older residential semi custom homes can be found on some streets with rolling land a bit of a view.  A beautiful portion of East Plano has been set aside as a green belt with extensive acreage that covers nature trails, bike and hiking trails and a nature learning center.  This is part of a natural green belt area that has been left open to provide continuous open space from Lake Ray Hubbard and Rowlett Creek Preserve up thru Garland, Richardson, Plano past Oak Point park over to the west side of Plano.  On the west side is Chase Oaks golf course and Connemara Meadow.  With small breaks the green expanse has been extended many miles to maintain a nature corridor.

Los Rios Country Club and Pecan Hollow Golf Course attract a stream of golfers.  Off of Spring Creek there are the ranchettes that were developed in the early 80s.  One development was named Ranch Estate and these types of developments had half acre lots up to 5 and 10 acres to have room for horses.  Riding stables can be found close to the open green areas.  South Fork of the "Dallas" hit series is not far from this area in E. Plano.

 

Those who live in far west Plano tend to use the Toll road to go downtown or to access 635 (LBJ) for a commute to the D/F.W. airport or Los Collinas.  George Bush Freeway has created a whole new way to travel from east to west and has connected suburbs to the east into the Metroplex making commuting an easier task. Many changes are being made on  Highway 121 to eventually make it an expanded highway without continual stops.  In the future there wil be expansion of Dart to have east/west traffic between the east suburbs of Dallas to the Dallas/Ft. Worth airport and beyond.